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Home / Community / IKE Dike Featured on 60 Minutes

IKE Dike Featured on 60 Minutes

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Texas A&M University at Galveston’s Ike Dike project was featured this last Sunday on the 50th Anniversary edition of the acclaimed CBS News broadcast of 60 Minutes. The 60 Minutes crew arrived in the Houston/Galveston area last Sunday. As part of the program, they videotaped the flooding results and cleanup of Hurricane Harvey’s devastation and interviewed Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. Texas A&M Galveston researcher, Dr. Sam Brody, was interviewed by CBS News correspondent Scott Pelley on the university’s research on hurricane surge protection and flooding.
The program can be found on: https://www.cbsnews.com/videos/hurricane-the-fighter-divided/
If nothing else, this interview highlights the wisdom and forethought of our city planners in Texas City by providing a levee and floodgates which largely protected our city for the degree of destruction and devastation experienced in Houston during and after Harvey. I say after because the destruction caused by the antiquated reservoirs whose floodwaters had to be released, flooding neighborhoods that had gotten by with little damage from the actual storm with waters reaching up to 6’ in places.
Dr. Brody’s stance is that understanding that the warming of our planet brings about conditions that alter and intensify the power of these storms is only one piece of the puzzle. Acknowledging and planning for the occurrence of such storms; not building in a floodplain, adjusting for the acres and acres of concrete, turning unused developed areas into additional reservoirs; those are the responsible acts which, although they would run into the billions to accomplish, would save almost as many billions in recovery costs – aside from the human suffering and loss that would be avoided.

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